January : Poetika 40 : ‘Resolution’ The Cloisters, Wednesday 18th January, 7.30 for 7.45pm

poetika-xxxx
Hello everyone,Here’s the flyer for our next show on Wednesday 18th January, 7.30 for 7.45pm,
£2-3pp at the door towards expenses please. Please note we’re back at The Cloisters, Catherine Street, Salisbury, this month, after the Christmas session at St Thomas’s.John and I both wish you all a happy, healthy and creative New Year. Our theme this time is ‘Resolution’ or if you’re inspired to some very vivid writing, ‘High Resolution’.  But as always, we welcome songs, poems, etc on any topic, your own work or anybody’s that you’d like to bring along. Electric eclectic, is our traditional motto that I’ve just invented, we don’t mind, the main thing is just to roll up and enjoy the evening, performing or listening: extra voices, ears, always welcome.

Here’s one I wrote a few years ago. Perhaps like me, you’ve noticed how haunting music can be when heard from the room next door, so this is one such memory. It was also prompted by the misspelling of the media used in a piece of artwork which was supposed to read ‘varnish and thread’:

Oak secrets

…songs from a hidden guitar vanish and thread
from the room next door…beneath dull shoes

oak secrets, every knot a witness in the grain
to stones defeated while roots gripped earth

like shipwrecked knuckles in storms lashed
across patient centuries. How many hooves

passed those trees? How many lovers laid
safe close to improvise hot magic there?

…brief smoke twists, hearth cracked fire,
melt crystal notes from a hidden guitar…

Hope you’re all keeping warm at the mo, see you on the night,

all the best, scarcrow dave

PS don’t forget our extra event on 1st Feb –  “I Hate Housework”- an evening of prose, poetry and comedy. Do come along and support a very funny and thought provoking show by one of our members, Clare Macnaughton. It’s completely free – no contribution for the room on this occasion.

Salisbury's open mic 2016

Salisbury’s excellent open mic

 

 

 

 

 

Poetika XXXVIII – Duffy’s Echo

Despite the fact the Poet Laureate did not attend our meeting on Wednesday – probably because she hadn’t been invited – we had another good turnout including new faces and some welcome returners. Many followed our theme by reading some of Carol Ann Duffy’s work, but there were plenty of original contributions too.’Parking seems to be getting harder, despite the large Brown Street car park behind our venue, so it may be worth allowing an extra few minutes if you’re coming by car.

David King did the customary introductions before beginning with Prayer by Ms Duffy – “the truth enters our hearts, that small familiar pain” then followed with something of his own, though he “can’t stay here, because the air’s too thin”. Graham ‘Gray’ Turner continued by “feeding the chickens that laid the golden eggs on our fantasy world”, then Edwin read us History by Ms Duffy – “She’d seen them ease him down from the Cross, his mother gasping for breath, as though his death was a difficult birth”.

Vic brought us a musical interlude where he sang of Salisbury’s dancing man, where watchers were ‘itching to move their feet’, then Mike dribbled about ‘toddlers with tools they may grow up to use”. John made sure he was first to jump the Christmas gun by reading the Laureate’s ‘Christmas Eve’, before reminding us all of the sad news that Leonard Cohen had died, by reading his ‘Poem’ – “I hear a man climb stairs and clear his throat outside our door “. David Robinson followed this with a further tribute to Cohen – ‘The Stranger Song ‘ – “I told you when I came I was a stranger”, before James surprised us all with his assertion that he knew Carol Ann Duffy “before she was gay”.

It was nice to see Papa Webb back to wonder why King Kong or Godzilla had never won an Oscar, and how he’d been “at sea all day, and caught Rockall”, and Inga, who told of “blue grey eyes, that make women want you”, and she wished “that you could be me, for one hour”. Nicky followed with ‘Stealing’, by Carol Ann Duffy – “You don’t understand a word I’m saying, do you?” before performing one of her own – “uncertainty is the new certainty”.

Alison read Cohen’s ‘A thousand Kisses Deep’ – “And then consented to be wrecked, A Thousand Kisses Deep”, Lenka then gave us her Autumn Sketch – “is an afternoon walk, before the dusk brings its dark shadows”, and David King wound up the first half with another from Duffy – ‘Drunk’ – “unseen frogs belch in the damp grass” – was he suggesting something?

The second half saw David King get us going with Duffy’s ‘Litany’ – “A tiny ladder ran up Mrs Barr’s American Tan leg”, before David Robinson returned with a short selection from her collection ‘The World’s Wife’ – including Mrs Icarus and Mrs Darwin. Mike was back with more flash fiction – “squinting through a wall you’ve always found opaque”, and Papa Webb entertained us again with a cautionary tale about the dragon at the door.

It was Vic’s turn again and he brought us Duffy’s ‘The Dark’ – “there’s nothing to be frightened of at all. (Except for aliens…)” then performed for us Leonard Cohen’s famous ‘Bird on the Wire’. Inga returned having been asked “do you want a hand with that, Luv” and told “get down you crazy mare”, and Nicky told us “this kid’s so unpopular, even my imaginary friends have left me”. Lenka treated us to a short children’s poem in her native Czech, ‘Little Bear’, and was good enough to translate it into English for us too. David King then closed proceedings, warning us that “time is a thief in black and white” and that “we rarely notice how fast slowness happens.
It was another great meeting, and thank you all – everyone who came to share their and others’ work, and also those who came just to listen. Our next meeting will be the Christmas one – now we meet on the third Wednesday this means it will be very close to Christmas – on the 21st of December – and we do hope you’ll be able to come.

We’ll be meeting in a different venue to leave the Cloisters free for Christmas dinners and also to allow us to bring our own Yuletide refreshments – so make a note – for next month only we’ll be meeting in St Thomas’s house – on the corner of the walk through between Dinghams and Cote Brasserie (was Snells) – St Thomas’s Square. Opposite St Thomas’s church. We’ll be providing mince pies and a little alcoholic and non-alcoholic refreshment as there is no bar (you are welcome to bring your own), and our theme will be Christmas – and traditionally we celebrate the lighter side of the season – so bring your more humorous work! But more details in our event invitation nearer the date.

To finish off, it was interesting to hear from David Robinson that there is a longer version (finally finished in 2009) of Leonard Cohen’s ‘A thousand Kisses Deep’ than the one Alison read – so here it is:

A Thousand Kisses Deep

You came to me this morning
And you handled me like meat.
You´d have live alone to know
How good that feels, how sweet.
Anonymous, and hard, and fast –
(I´d know you in my sleep) –
Then born together, born at last
A thousand kisses deep.

I loved you when you opened
Like a lily to the heat.
I´m just another snowman
Standing in the rain and sleet,
Who loved you with his frozen love
His second-hand physique –
With all he is, and all he was
A thousand kisses deep.

All soaked in sex, and pressed against
The limits of the sea:
I saw there were no oceans left
For scavengers like me.
We made it to the forward deck
I blessed our remnant fleet –
And then consented to be wrecked
A thousand kisses deep.

It´s true that you could lie to me
It´s true you could to cheat
The means no longer guarantee
The virtue in deceit.
That truth is bent, that beauty spent,
That style is obsolete –
O since the Holy Spirit went
A thousand kisses deep.

(So what about this inner Light
That´s boundless and unique?
I´m slouching through another night
A thousand kisses deep.)

I´m turning tricks; I´m getting fixed,
I´m back on Boogie Street.
I tried to quit the business –
Hey, I´m lazy and I´m weak.
But sometimes when the night is slow,
The wretched and the meek,
We gather up our hearts and go
A thousand kisses deep.

(And fragrant is the thought of you,
The file is now complete –
Except what we forgot to do
A thousand kisses deep.)

The ponies run, the girls are young,
The odds are there to beat.
You win a while, and then it´s done –
Your little winning streak.
And summoned now to deal
With your invincible defeat,
You live your life as if it´s real
A thousand kisses deep.

(I jammed with Diz and Dante –
I did not have their sweep –
But once or twice, they let me play
A thousand kisses deep.)

And I´m still working with the wine,
Still dancing cheek to cheek.
The band is playing “Auld Lang Syne” –
The heart will not retreat.
And maybe I had miles to drive,
And promises to keep –
Your ditch it all to stay alive
A thousand kisses deep.

And now you are the Angel Death
And now the Paraclete;
Now you are the Quickening Breath
And now the Belsen heap.
No turning from the threat of love,
No acrobatic leap –
As witnessed here in time and blood
A thousand kisses deep

Beautiful as he always is

Andover Story telling club starts this Thursday at Lunar Hare 7.45pm

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 Hare Today Story club, Thursday, 13th October,7.45-10 pm in The Snug,The Lunar Hare, Weyhill Road,AndoverAdmission Free

Come and listen, come and tell
Run by Mike Rogers 

Story, story! Who wants to hear a story? Everyone, of course.

“Once upon a time…”

“Come on! That’s just for kids!”

“All right – last Tuesday – ”

“That’s better!”

“… in a galaxy far, far away…”

“What?”

Stories are stories, they pick us up and they take us away, sometimes into other worlds, sometimes inside ourselves, to places we’ve never been or didn’t know were there. They bring us face to face with new things and with old things, and often the old things turn out to be new things, because we’re looking at them from another side.

Reading is good. You can do it anywhere, anytime, if there’s enough light to see. It disturbs no one. But it is a solitary vice.

Listening to a story, on the other hand, is something social. There is an interaction with the teller – they notice the reaction of you, the listener, and they can adjust their story to it. Actors on a stage, in a normal play, would find that much harder. They usually have a text to stick to. A storyteller only has a story – and they can tell it in the way they feel like at that very moment. What occurs to them – what occurs to you – it can all find a place in that story.

I have been telling stories for fourteen years. I have been writing stories since I was eight, and when I first came to Southampton Story Club I used to read aloud the stories I had written. I had written them to sound as though they were being told, so they had digressions and interruptions and spaces for audience reaction. Sometimes I still like to perform my stories that way, because a written story can be a lot more precise and complicated and detailed than a told one – it’s the relationship between lace and knitting. But mostly I tell.

What do I tell? Stories I like. Stories that go into me easily, because they fit my nature. I tell Greek myths. I tell Norse myths. I tell wonder-tales from Russia, with the Firebird in them. I tell stories from Japan, sad ones and happy ones. I tell classic folktales from Europe, as written by Perrault or collected by the Brothers Grimm. [I can tell stories in French and German as well.] I tell Jewish stories. I tell stories from Afghanistan and stories from the Arabian Nights.

I also tell stories that are true, if they have the right shape and feel. I have told the story of the first maypole in New England, at Merrymount, and the trouble it caused among the devout New Englanders. I have told the story of George Vancouver and his conflict with Mike Rogers Thomas Pitt, second Baron Camelford, and compared it with the behaviour of Maquinna, the chief of one of the tribes on Nootka Sound, which Vancouver explored and mapped. I have told the story of ‘Don Patricio’, the Irish international footballer and football manager, who saved Barcelona FC in the Spanish Civil War. I have told the story of Grayson Perry’s tapestry sequence, The Vanity of Small Differences.

There are stories everywhere. We make them up all the time. We change them and they change us. They are one of the ways in which we try to come to terms with the world.

I am always telling the same stories, and I am always hunting for new ones, and I am always thinking about how I can tell the old ones differently. I can also help people to tell stories – stories about themselves, about their lives up to now, about the way they would like their lives to be in the future. Imagination is the key to freedom – in the inner world and in the outer one.

 

 

WONDER OF WORDS is republished from https://suewrinch.wordpress.com with her permission

The first ‘Wonder Of Words’ was held at Winchester Discovery Centre on Thursday 28th July and fully lived up to its name.  It was an evening filled with a rich variety of inspiring words.

SteveScholeyIMG_1022

Steve Scholey

My inaugural ‘guest poet’, Steve Scholey entertained us with a  mix of both old and brand new poems.  So new in fact that he told me he was just putting the final touches to some minutes before going on!  I enjoyed these new poems in particular.  They were clever, concise and original, often having a wry twist or a word summing up the poem at the end. He also read poems reflecting his interest in geology and travels to Iceland.  A very enjoyable set.

 

There was plenty of time for Open Mic during the evening and we heard a wonderful variety of voices.  Poems, whether poignant, political or humorous were all interesting and affecting, showcasing a great wealth of local talent.  We were swept away by a tide of amazing words which is why I love setting up these evenings. ‘Wonder of Words’ will be held regularly on the last Thursday of the month and its main aim is to highlight and encourage local talent.  I may occasionally book an established poet – we shall see, but I’m really looking forward to hearing many more of your original and enthusiastic  voices over the coming months.

Open Word July 24th Very enjoyable

“Very enjoyable”, “excellent standard of poets” and “a great atmosphere” was the feedback we received from our audience. They loved the inclusiveness of our event.

Open Word is held at The Grosvenor, in the beautiful town of Stockbridge, Hampshire. The Open Word Café runs from 1.30pm – 4.00pm, every 4th Sunday of the month

It was a reading of two halves.Cat Randle performed  the sacrificial poem and played with the audience while educating them about technology with The purple fantastic feels like elastic spangled and plastic ray gun.

Rosey our poet from Mencap, read her power point poem called Taxi. When she talked about taxi’s she couldn’t get into we saw taxi’s in a very different way.

Mike Rogers proved he didn’t need the microphone. We loved his retelling of Greek myths. He took the theme of families and re-created a gripping story . My favourite lines were “Blood is thicker than water. Do you have to shed it to find out.”

Mike Rogers and his fabulous hat

Mike Rogers and his fabulous hat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Robinson included us in his artistic process. He’s found a picture for his poem Genesis. His familial look at Adam and Eve’s first year away from the garden.  He also took us to the time of protest in 60’s London and how it impacted his hitchhiking home. “It was yesterday, it was years ago,”

David Robinson at Genesis

David Robinson at Genesis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Hubble An embarrassment guide to the Chinese was a well constructed clever list poem. A fabulous reply to Boris Johnson’s comment about what the Chinese contributed to culture. Quite a lot if you carefully listen to David. Cat was taken with his poem about cats regrets. Finally,  Michael Gove was the subject of David’s bile as his poem insulted him in beautiful Shakespearian-style language.

David Hubble sharing satire when politicians speak without thinking

David Hubble sharing satire when politicians speak without thinking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caro Reeves was greeting with an introduction about 5 lovely things Cat appreciated about her. Her Bird watching in Waitrose comparing the current  hoi-poloi to birds of prey. Her  poem Grand found an inspiration in nature was about being taken down a peg or two. “If you’re unique you’re not alone.” Her poem  in praise of fracking was a hymn for any eco-warrior and a wake-up call. Her set finished with Great moths reminding us of why we need our countryside2016-07-24 14.02.42

 

 

 

 

 

Syd Meats introduced himself as an ego warrior which explained his tee shirt and how this movement was created to help uphold people’s self-esteem. He read 4 poems in the first half The penultimate question version 1. His witty post-Brexit poem was short and a crowd pleaser. He read one of my favourite environmental poems, reminiscent of Edward Lear in its absurdity and swift in its brevity; If. His 4th poem I must not took us from cradle to grave through one man’s life defined by what he must not do.

Syd Meats helping us up hold our self esteem

Syd Meats helping us uphold our self-esteem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charlotte Sherwood was able to fit us in before she moves west. Charlotte is a lyrical poet who helps us appreciate nature in its grand and intimate moments. Her first poem line  “know you have been and remember.” was very comforting. She then took us to The Ham on New Year’s day which is a place in Tewksbury and we walked with her family in the cold. Her final poem Remember had some lovely twists of word play which ensorcel us in her idyll spell.

Charlotte Sherwood weaving a wonderful word picture

Charlotte Sherwood weaving a wonderful word picture

We ask for feedback at the end of each session and we were asked if the guest poets and musicians could play in the first and second half.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest poet, Duncan Green after introducing one of his signature poems, Why create used his first half to take us on a journey into the world of early fatherhood. He examined the father’s relationship with a child in his poems Gravity,Reveal and I’m Father Christmas. He subtly captured the emotional roller coaster of early parenthood. In the second half, he explored Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. He experimented with slam and non-slam rhythms varying pace which helped us take on all the intricate concepts inside his writing.The second set is still young. Once completely learnt by heart, he will edit the poems into an even more powerful offering. He is a capable philosopher poet and this cycle is an excellent exploration of Maslow’s pyramid.

Duncan Green promising not to drop his inner child

Duncan Green sharing the wonder of a small baby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Les Kazoos D’Amour. We questioned was it love of kazoos or kazoo love. We fell in love with Matt and Janet’s energy, stage banter and wonderful choice of energetic, wistful, uplifting, catchy, funny songs. Their own particular verve and personal spin lift these show tunes, songs, ditties, old and new and give them a snazzy jazzy life.  I particularly loved Ivor Cutlers; Go and sit upon the grass.This is the magic of Les Kazoos D’Amour, their sets are like being greeted by a long lost friend who is happy to see us again. We finished off their second set with a song medley involving a lot of 60’s songs and Jeremy Corbyn. I love them and they deliver joy, fun and a darn fine sing along.

Kazoo D'Amour with they wonderful banter

Kazoos D’Amour with their  wonderful banter

 

 

Wonder of Words to showcase Steve Scholey

Just to remind you that the first evening of the new ‘Wonder Of Words’ will be on Thursday 28th July at the Winchester Discovery Centre, Jewry Street, Winchester. SO23 8SB. 7.30-9.30pm, £5 on the door.
To encourage local talent there will also be ‘guest spots’.  The inaugural ‘guest poet’ will be Steve Scholey. Steve is a local poet and a ringleader of Not The Winchester Poetry Festival, a fringe event held alongside the official Festival in October.
Sue Wrinch aiming to use these events to highlight and celebrate local writing talent, whether male or female, so there will be lots of time to share your work in the Open Mic sessions.  Please come along with your poems, short stories, flash fiction or excerpts from a novel you have written or are writing and share in a warm, supportive atmosphere.

Please come along, hear Steve’s work and perhaps share your own or just listen to the wonderful variety of voices in and around

Steve reading out his poetry at Andover Celebration of National Poetry Day

Steve reading out his poetry at Andover Celebration of National Poetry Day

Winchester.  .

Amazing music and stunning poetry at Stockbridge open word on July 24th

We (Gavin especially) is very excited to bring you our guests to Stockbridge this month.

Duncan Green sharing his mobile phone poem

Duncan Green sharing his mobile phone poem

We saw Duncan Green at Gavin’s very first open word. Duncan’s poem about his life to date had a standing ovation. I’ve just seen him at June 2016 open mic where he gave us a glimpse of what is coming. The room went silent and roared into applause when he’d finished. Don’t miss this one, it’s going to be a groundbreaker.

This is what Duncan says about himself

Southampton based writer Duncan Green developed his performance style through amateur dramatics, entertaining his bored sister, counselling and regular attendance of open mic nights around London.
Duncan will be debuting two pieces at Open Word:

Les Kazoo D'amour, these two won't hurt a fly honestly

Les Kazoo D’amour, these two won’t hurt a fly honestly

1) Dear You: a fictional account of a father’s relationship with his child.
2) Function of Living: a poem loosely based on Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.
Duncan Green hopes to see you all there so he can talk to you about writing, families and bored sisters.

Les Kazoo D’amour, is a two-piece musical duo who musical repertoire is full of funny, witty, wistful ukelele music. They charm audiences and give us enough time between songs to let us catch our breath. You need to because these accomplished musicians make you laugh and cry and cry because you are laughing so hard.

I know it’s my job to say come along, however, trust me, you really don’t want to miss this musical guest. Amazing just doesn’t do them justice. Bring a friend you’ll be glad you did.

Open Word is at The Grovsner Hotel, Stockbridge SO20 3EUon July 24th, doors open at 1pm and sign up for the Open mic is at 1pm .

Hat Poets 2016 by reveiw by Hampshire Laureate Isobel Rogers

Hat Poets 2016

by isabelrogers

streetOn Saturday 2 July I led an intrepid team of poets onto Parchment Street in Winchester to take part in the annualHat Fair celebrations. Sorry it has taken me a week to get this up online (realise this sounds as if I think watching Andy Murray winning Wimbledon is more important … anyway, we’re here now).

Our line-up of fabulous local talent comprised: Joan McGavin, my predecessor as Hampshire Poet 2014; Syd Meats, Chair of Romsey’s Tea Poet Collective; Lynda O’Neill, a Winchester poet; Hugh Greasley, a painter-poet; Sue Wrinch, who runs two regular poetry/prose events in Winchester; Steve Scholey, a ringleader of Not The Winchester Poetry Festival; Rosemary Brook-Hart, currently studying for a languages degree; andCat Randle, a steampunk poet from Andover, who performed as her steampunk persona Merciful Grace the Mechanical Maid.

We played Hunt The Microphone at the beginning, braved rainstorms and wind gusts that threatened to overcome my clothespeg/music stand combo. At one point I was standing behind Steve, holding an umbrella over him and his poems. But our wonderfully enthusiastic audience stuck with us and enjoyed all our performances.

Here are a few pictures from our afternoon – again, apologies for not getting pics of all the poets as they performed (Rosemary and Syd). I was sometimes distracted by rain-management or microphone issues, or (in the case of Syd) too mesmerised by his Darlek impression and forgot to get my phone out.

joan

lynda

hugh

sue

steve

cat

hat fair