Teapoets are returning on September 10th!

We here at Big Up Words are excited because The Teapoets Cafe is returning September 10th.

Co founder Cat Randle gets very excited. “I look forward to meeting up with all the poet’s and finding out what they’ve done on their summer break.”

Here they are in their own words

Spetember 10th

 

 

 

 

 

To kick off our new season, we look forward to welcoming guest poet Peter Roe, and singer-songwriter Lisa Thorne.

We welcome one and all who enjoy poetry (either as audience or readers). Come along and have some listening fun, and maybe introduce a friend to the joys of the spoken word too. A warm welcome awaits.

Rum’s Eg gallery and cafe are open throughout.

Spoken word open spots may be booked in advance by sending an email to signup1709@teapoet.org.uk and we will keep some in reserve on the door.

About the guest-Peter Roe guest poet

Peter RoePeter Roe was born and raised a ‘Northern Lad’ in Buxton in the Peak District. He has served in the RAF and has worked with computers and emerging technologies in education.
Peter is a poet, writer, film-maker and self confessed Nerd who likes to shatter people’s pre and misconceptions about “Computer Geeks and Anoraks!”
Peter’s poems and stories come out of that bit of the world where technology meets people and have been well received at public readings both in the South West of England and The Netherlands where he was dubbed ‘The Techno-Poet’. As the Millennium ticked over he became embroiled in a Poetry War with his Father and his Siblings… as the words flew it created a schism within the family. ‘The War of The Words’ that followed was a breeding ground for many of his performance pieces.
Forced into early retirement with only a dictionary and a smartphone for company… He remains an eternal optimist and describes himself as “Disabled by Bread… Soft int’ head… Dad of Three… Addicted to Eye Tee… Poet and Writer… App Game Fighter…”
He is constantly rhyming and punning and is currently working on ‘Reunification’ a poetry event with his Brother to be premiered at The Buxton Fringe in 2018.

Musical guest-Lisa Thorne

Lisa Thorne has never looked back since her uncle introduced her to the music of Steeleye Span when she was a child. Working with an intuitive style, she refines songs until they ‘fit’ the images in her mind.
She is particularly interested in the narrative of the voice, using words to pin down a point of that narrative, rather then to express or describe.
“Folk is certainly an influence,” explains Lisa, “as I adore the melody lines, harmonies, and rhythms.” We are delighted to introduce Lisa to the TeaPoet Collective as we feel her songs deserve wider exposure, and we’re sure you will agree.

And finally news about becoming a member of Teapoets 

Teapoet membership card 2017-2018 (4)

 

 

 

 

 

Our membership cards for the next season will be available when we return to Rum’s Eg on Sunday 10th September. For £30 you will get:

  • Admission to 8 TeaPoet Cafes (September to April) for the price of 6
  • Admission for a guest to the above events for half price
  • The opportunity to sell your books etc. on our merchandise table

 

 

 

 

Open Word starts this weekend at Arundels

Open Words Arnudels (Ted Health’s house) SP1 2EN Cathedral Close Salisbury June 11th starting at 1.30-4.30 

Yes Open Word is back with 2 dates and loads of fun. We start this weekend at Arundels. This is our first event in a garden. Bring picnic blankets, chairs and lots of poetry. We will be having an open Mic so looking forward to your poems.

Poetry guest Paul Canon Harris 

Paul_Cannon_Harris

Paul is a poet and versatile writer based in Bournemouth. Published work includes two poetry collections, and non-fiction works on spirituality, leadership and communication. Recent poems have featured on Yellow Buses and in the PR for an aid convoy to Aleppo. He broadcasts regularly on BBC Radio 2 and other stations and performs poetry at festivals and venues in the UK and abroad.
Guest Musician Steve Faulkner 
Steve is unique amongst performers in the Folk genre in that he has never, ever been even nominated for any award of any kind. He remains unconcerned by this, as awards for performing arts seem to him to be, “Comparing Chalk and Cheese and then giving the prize to an Avocado.” Hailing from Poole in Dorset, Steve is a multi-instrumentalist and vocalist with his own take on Traditional, Folk and Acoustic music. Playing Fiddle, Bouzouki, Low Whistles, Bodhrán and to everyone’s surprise (including his) Double Bass and Bass Guitar, he has worked over the past 20 or so years in a number of groups across the UK and Europe with wide ranging musical appeal as well as giving solo performances. Appearing on a discography of five album and one EP release, Steve can go from lively in-yer-face frontman to sensitive accompanist at will and anything in between.

With special guest MC

Dave reading from one of his books.

Dave reading from one of his books.

David is a regular at Teapoets and other open Mic around the South East. He has been guest at many open mic’s around the South East England David’s poetry has a strong connection to our world and his poetry helps us relate to our earth and ourselves in new ways.
The Travelling Bookstall will be available along with books by the performers and MC.

 

January : Poetika 40 : ‘Resolution’ The Cloisters, Wednesday 18th January, 7.30 for 7.45pm

poetika-xxxx
Hello everyone,Here’s the flyer for our next show on Wednesday 18th January, 7.30 for 7.45pm,
£2-3pp at the door towards expenses please. Please note we’re back at The Cloisters, Catherine Street, Salisbury, this month, after the Christmas session at St Thomas’s.John and I both wish you all a happy, healthy and creative New Year. Our theme this time is ‘Resolution’ or if you’re inspired to some very vivid writing, ‘High Resolution’.  But as always, we welcome songs, poems, etc on any topic, your own work or anybody’s that you’d like to bring along. Electric eclectic, is our traditional motto that I’ve just invented, we don’t mind, the main thing is just to roll up and enjoy the evening, performing or listening: extra voices, ears, always welcome.

Here’s one I wrote a few years ago. Perhaps like me, you’ve noticed how haunting music can be when heard from the room next door, so this is one such memory. It was also prompted by the misspelling of the media used in a piece of artwork which was supposed to read ‘varnish and thread’:

Oak secrets

…songs from a hidden guitar vanish and thread
from the room next door…beneath dull shoes

oak secrets, every knot a witness in the grain
to stones defeated while roots gripped earth

like shipwrecked knuckles in storms lashed
across patient centuries. How many hooves

passed those trees? How many lovers laid
safe close to improvise hot magic there?

…brief smoke twists, hearth cracked fire,
melt crystal notes from a hidden guitar…

Hope you’re all keeping warm at the mo, see you on the night,

all the best, scarcrow dave

PS don’t forget our extra event on 1st Feb –  “I Hate Housework”- an evening of prose, poetry and comedy. Do come along and support a very funny and thought provoking show by one of our members, Clare Macnaughton. It’s completely free – no contribution for the room on this occasion.

Andover Story telling club starts this Thursday at Lunar Hare 7.45pm

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 Hare Today Story club, Thursday, 13th October,7.45-10 pm in The Snug,The Lunar Hare, Weyhill Road,AndoverAdmission Free

Come and listen, come and tell
Run by Mike Rogers 

Story, story! Who wants to hear a story? Everyone, of course.

“Once upon a time…”

“Come on! That’s just for kids!”

“All right – last Tuesday – ”

“That’s better!”

“… in a galaxy far, far away…”

“What?”

Stories are stories, they pick us up and they take us away, sometimes into other worlds, sometimes inside ourselves, to places we’ve never been or didn’t know were there. They bring us face to face with new things and with old things, and often the old things turn out to be new things, because we’re looking at them from another side.

Reading is good. You can do it anywhere, anytime, if there’s enough light to see. It disturbs no one. But it is a solitary vice.

Listening to a story, on the other hand, is something social. There is an interaction with the teller – they notice the reaction of you, the listener, and they can adjust their story to it. Actors on a stage, in a normal play, would find that much harder. They usually have a text to stick to. A storyteller only has a story – and they can tell it in the way they feel like at that very moment. What occurs to them – what occurs to you – it can all find a place in that story.

I have been telling stories for fourteen years. I have been writing stories since I was eight, and when I first came to Southampton Story Club I used to read aloud the stories I had written. I had written them to sound as though they were being told, so they had digressions and interruptions and spaces for audience reaction. Sometimes I still like to perform my stories that way, because a written story can be a lot more precise and complicated and detailed than a told one – it’s the relationship between lace and knitting. But mostly I tell.

What do I tell? Stories I like. Stories that go into me easily, because they fit my nature. I tell Greek myths. I tell Norse myths. I tell wonder-tales from Russia, with the Firebird in them. I tell stories from Japan, sad ones and happy ones. I tell classic folktales from Europe, as written by Perrault or collected by the Brothers Grimm. [I can tell stories in French and German as well.] I tell Jewish stories. I tell stories from Afghanistan and stories from the Arabian Nights.

I also tell stories that are true, if they have the right shape and feel. I have told the story of the first maypole in New England, at Merrymount, and the trouble it caused among the devout New Englanders. I have told the story of George Vancouver and his conflict with Mike Rogers Thomas Pitt, second Baron Camelford, and compared it with the behaviour of Maquinna, the chief of one of the tribes on Nootka Sound, which Vancouver explored and mapped. I have told the story of ‘Don Patricio’, the Irish international footballer and football manager, who saved Barcelona FC in the Spanish Civil War. I have told the story of Grayson Perry’s tapestry sequence, The Vanity of Small Differences.

There are stories everywhere. We make them up all the time. We change them and they change us. They are one of the ways in which we try to come to terms with the world.

I am always telling the same stories, and I am always hunting for new ones, and I am always thinking about how I can tell the old ones differently. I can also help people to tell stories – stories about themselves, about their lives up to now, about the way they would like their lives to be in the future. Imagination is the key to freedom – in the inner world and in the outer one.

 

 

WONDER OF WORDS is republished from https://suewrinch.wordpress.com with her permission

The first ‘Wonder Of Words’ was held at Winchester Discovery Centre on Thursday 28th July and fully lived up to its name.  It was an evening filled with a rich variety of inspiring words.

SteveScholeyIMG_1022

Steve Scholey

My inaugural ‘guest poet’, Steve Scholey entertained us with a  mix of both old and brand new poems.  So new in fact that he told me he was just putting the final touches to some minutes before going on!  I enjoyed these new poems in particular.  They were clever, concise and original, often having a wry twist or a word summing up the poem at the end. He also read poems reflecting his interest in geology and travels to Iceland.  A very enjoyable set.

 

There was plenty of time for Open Mic during the evening and we heard a wonderful variety of voices.  Poems, whether poignant, political or humorous were all interesting and affecting, showcasing a great wealth of local talent.  We were swept away by a tide of amazing words which is why I love setting up these evenings. ‘Wonder of Words’ will be held regularly on the last Thursday of the month and its main aim is to highlight and encourage local talent.  I may occasionally book an established poet – we shall see, but I’m really looking forward to hearing many more of your original and enthusiastic  voices over the coming months.

Wonder of Words to showcase Steve Scholey

Just to remind you that the first evening of the new ‘Wonder Of Words’ will be on Thursday 28th July at the Winchester Discovery Centre, Jewry Street, Winchester. SO23 8SB. 7.30-9.30pm, £5 on the door.
To encourage local talent there will also be ‘guest spots’.  The inaugural ‘guest poet’ will be Steve Scholey. Steve is a local poet and a ringleader of Not The Winchester Poetry Festival, a fringe event held alongside the official Festival in October.
Sue Wrinch aiming to use these events to highlight and celebrate local writing talent, whether male or female, so there will be lots of time to share your work in the Open Mic sessions.  Please come along with your poems, short stories, flash fiction or excerpts from a novel you have written or are writing and share in a warm, supportive atmosphere.

Please come along, hear Steve’s work and perhaps share your own or just listen to the wonderful variety of voices in and around

Steve reading out his poetry at Andover Celebration of National Poetry Day

Steve reading out his poetry at Andover Celebration of National Poetry Day

Winchester.  .

Amazing music and stunning poetry at Stockbridge open word on July 24th

We (Gavin especially) is very excited to bring you our guests to Stockbridge this month.

Duncan Green sharing his mobile phone poem

Duncan Green sharing his mobile phone poem

We saw Duncan Green at Gavin’s very first open word. Duncan’s poem about his life to date had a standing ovation. I’ve just seen him at June 2016 open mic where he gave us a glimpse of what is coming. The room went silent and roared into applause when he’d finished. Don’t miss this one, it’s going to be a groundbreaker.

This is what Duncan says about himself

Southampton based writer Duncan Green developed his performance style through amateur dramatics, entertaining his bored sister, counselling and regular attendance of open mic nights around London.
Duncan will be debuting two pieces at Open Word:

Les Kazoo D'amour, these two won't hurt a fly honestly

Les Kazoo D’amour, these two won’t hurt a fly honestly

1) Dear You: a fictional account of a father’s relationship with his child.
2) Function of Living: a poem loosely based on Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.
Duncan Green hopes to see you all there so he can talk to you about writing, families and bored sisters.

Les Kazoo D’amour, is a two-piece musical duo who musical repertoire is full of funny, witty, wistful ukelele music. They charm audiences and give us enough time between songs to let us catch our breath. You need to because these accomplished musicians make you laugh and cry and cry because you are laughing so hard.

I know it’s my job to say come along, however, trust me, you really don’t want to miss this musical guest. Amazing just doesn’t do them justice. Bring a friend you’ll be glad you did.

Open Word is at The Grovsner Hotel, Stockbridge SO20 3EUon July 24th, doors open at 1pm and sign up for the Open mic is at 1pm .

Dave Robinson visual poetry and music from Victor Salt at Open Word

On Sunday 19th of June, at The Grovsner Hotel, SO20,6EU in Stockbridge,

Dave reading from one of his books.

Dave reading from one of his books.

Open word poetry guest David Robinson is bringing audiovisual poetry. Musical guest will be Andover’s country and western singer Alex Kruppa.

David Robinson is a poet and artist from Barton-on-Sea. On Facebook David has described his intentions for his guest slot.

“Because a lot of my visual art pieces incorporate my words, I shall be making this an Audio-Visual Experience, complete with projector and screen. Oh, the miracles of modern technology”

Born in London and brought up in the Sussex Downland, David studied at the University of Durham and at Bristol. He taught in Cornwall and in Kent for many years, resigning from his post as Head of Modern Languages in 1999 to spend more time pursuing the elusive goal of becoming an artist and writer.

A poet and visual artist, David works with words, with photography, found objects,pressed flowers, gold leaf, etc, to create images and 3D pieces. Themes are drawn from ancient mythologies and archetypes, from English folk traditions and from the interplay between the spirit of Nature and the human spirit. He is influenced too by surrealism, by a sense of the deep absurdity and beauty of life and all its contradictions, and by the belief that an appreciation of the human form is hard- wired into all of us, and is the beginning and inspiration for all art.

Boundary Stone from MoonTree Gallery http://www.moontree.org.uk/davids-landscapes.html

Boundary Stone from MoonTree Gallery http://www.moontree.org.uk/davids-landscapes.html

David has published two books of poetry and images: “The Book of Paper Dreams”(2013), and “This Deep Moment” (2015). Visual work has been exhibited in galleries in Kent, Hampshire, Dorset, Somerset, and at MOMA Wales.

David is a founder member of Folk Theatre Company “Rabble”, based in Kent, performing street theatre, mumming plays and traditional English music and dance.

With his artist wife, Deborah, David founded and ran The Moontree Gallery in Boscombe, Dorset, from 2007 till 2012. He lives in Hampshire, between the forest and the sea, with Deborah, two cats, and a tame Thesaurus.

 

Poeticka's Victor Salt His music is catchy, his lyrics poetic as he humorously captures the human condition and serves it to us with a side of empathy.

Poeticka’s Victor Salt His music is catchy, his lyrics poetic as he humorously captures the human condition and serves it to us with a side of empathy.

Victor Salt is a regular at Poetika in Salisbury. His music is catchy, his lyrics poetic as he humorously captures the human condition and serves it to us with a side of empathy.

An advocate of live local music he organises fringe events such as Salisbury XL.

Doors will open for Open Mic sign up at 1.00pm. Open Words welcomes all forms of spoken word, from novel readings, flash fiction, story tellers, musicans, songs, and poems long and short. Cost is £5.00

What the Open Word is all about

What the Open Word is all about