National Poetry Day is celebrated on Love Andover Radio today

National Poetry Day 2018 is on Thursday 4th October 2018 and the theme this year is ‘Change’.

Andover Radio’s Poet Laureate Daniel Hooks (“The Alien Poet”) has recorded  budding poets from around Andover to take part.

“We will broadcast one poem every hour during National Poetry Day”.

Daniel has recorded a wide range of poets from all over Andover. So tune in to listen to the sound of Andover Poetry today.

Winner of Andover Museums summer historical writing competiton

During the school summer holidays, Andover museum held a summer historical writing competition.

It was open to 5 – 15-year-olds. Children were invited to write a fictional piece of creative writing about a character found in the Museum. The historical facts had to be correct using information found in Andover Museum!

50 children signed up for this summer holiday challenge, only 9 children were shortlisted.

6 of those children were invited to  Andover museum Saturday, September 14th, 2018, treated to homemade lemonade and biscuits, before finding out the results of the competition.

Andover Town Mayor, Barbara Long and local children’s playwright Cat Randle awarded the prizes to the children.

The overall winner of the competition was Nicola Wheeler.

The judges were gripped by her creation of character and her illustration.

With 3 highly commended awards going to Lilla Stacey, Bradley Ware and Jessica Patterson. Lilla won because of her imaginative drawing, Bradley wrote non-fiction, this was not part of the requirements, however, the judges were taken with his writing style. Jessica’s created excellent lifelike characters and wrote about the Andover Workhouse.A.

“It happened in Hampshire,” a new play by Andoverian playwright Roy Chatfield.

The team that brought Andover ‘And Now We Tell Our Tale’ are returning to the Lights. Roy Chatfield’s new play  ‘It Happened In Hampshire’ will be staged there with a professional cast on Tuesday 5 February 2019.  It will also be visiting local schools.

Roy Chatfield

Roy Chatfield

It Happened In Hampshire’ is an irreverent romp through Hampshire’s past, incorporating music, rap and audience participation. Highlights include

  • Alfred defeating the Danes in The Great Wessex Bake Off
  • The Story of Edgar and Elfrida, as told by Jane Austen
  • A very civil Civil War.
  • Supernurse V the grime army
  • A starring role for an Iceberg
  • The secret of Spitfire modification XXX

The show is family friendly and you can book at The Lights.

 

 

Christmas present with a difference! Last days to fund 10 Little Astronauts

This year we supported Damon Wakes unbound book 10 Little Astronauts. He is literally days away from completing his goal and we need ALL your help. Please tweet, share, instagram, post and buy gift cards to help him reach 100% funding.

This is what Damon is saying

Last Chance to Support Ten Little Astronauts

It’s the eleventh hour. Aragorn is making his “It is not this day” speech. The rebels are approaching the Death Star. Neville Longbottom has destroyed the final horcrux and Harry Potter is preparing to battle Lord Voldemort. I’m not familiar with Twilight, but I’m sure there’s some confrontation between Heartthrob McSparklepants and a bad guy of some kind.

The point is, there are just days left to fund Ten Little Astronauts. At 63%, it’s the bulk of the way there and it has a solid chance of reaching its target, but only if the people who want that to happen make it happen.

At this point, you’re either behind the book or you’re not: there’s no time left to “get around to it.” 213 people (at current count) have pledged for a copy of their own. Countless more have shared it, told their friends about it, and generally helped it along in less direct ways. If it’s not your kind of thing, I get it. If you can’t afford to chip in for a copy right now, I definitely get it. But if you’d like to help my career as an author all the same, doing something – anything – to spread the word about it before that Christmas deadline would make a spectacular difference to the book’s chances of success at absolutely no cost to you.

For the benefit of anybody who’s coming across this for the first time (possibly having been pointed here by a friend):

Ten Little Astronauts is a sci-fi murder mystery novella based on Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. It takes the basic premise of that popular classic – ten people trapped together with the knowledge that one of them is a murderer – but shifts it into interstellar space.

The book is being published by Unbound, who crowdfund all their titles. This means that readers pledge for – essentially pre-order – a copy, and potentially extra rewards if they choose to contribute more to the funding of the book. Those pledges are what cover the cost of designing, editing and printing the thing. Ten Little Astronauts already has enough support to make it into print – other books that were accepted onto less ambitious lists have funded with less than half the number of readers behind them – but if it reaches 100% of its goal by Christmas, the paperback will be of higher quality and it’ll be distributed by Penguin Random House. Obviously, this would be a massive boost and help ensure the book has the best possible chance of success once it’s printed and out there.

For the benefit of anybody who wants to get some cool stuff:

There are rewards for supporting Ten Little Astronauts beyond getting a copy of the book itself, and even beyond the extras available to people who choose to contribute more than the minimum. Anybody who pledges, no matter the amount, will get:

People who pledge soon may get:

  • A place in a prize draw. When the book reaches 225 supporters, I’ll be sending a signed copy of Myths, Monsters, Mutations to one of those first 225 supporters at random. If we reach 250, I’ll most likely be doing much the same thing.
  • A badge. If Ten Little Astronauts reaches 100 Paperback pledges by the end of Monday 18th, I’ll be sending out a Ten Little Astronauts badge with every single paperback. We’re already (currently) at 83, so there’s a very good chance we’ll get to 100: the real question is whether enough people will share it around for that to happen before Monday.

Over 200 people have taken Ten Little Astronauts well over halfway to its target. It’s up to you to help take it those last few steps. If it sounds like your kind of book and you’d like a copy for yourself, please put in a pledge to get one, and invite your friends to do the same. If it’s not your cup of tea and/or you can’t afford to pledge for yourself, please share this post. The audience for this book is out there: the only challenge is reaching them in time.

Poetika are calling for poetry submissions for 2 different poetry festivals.

Salisbury Fringe Festival and Salisbury Literary Festival are both calling for poetry submissions.

 Poetika at the Salisbury Fringe: Call for Dramatic Poetry (closing date 30/9/2017)

Salisbury Fringe – the established festival of cutting-edge drama by local writers performed in a variety of informal venues during the first weekend in October. Poetika’s mission at the Fringe is to bring poetry to the drama. Poetika are seeking works of ‘dramatic poetry’ for the event, where they will be performed by professional actors.

Submissions close on  Saturday 30th September. E to email your pieces (5 mins max) to drama@poetika.org.uk .

To find out more about the Salisbury Fringe follow this link http://salisburyfringe.co.uk/

City of Poems’ (Salisbury Literary Festival ): Call for Poems about Salisbury (closing date 30/9/2017)

New this year- The Salisbury Literary Festival is  taking place over the last weekend of October it will be a feast of readings, talks and workshops, celebrating the best in literature by writers with a local connection and some from further afield.

Poetika has an event – City of Poems – as part of the festival, where in addition to presenting some of the best known poems written about the city, Poetika will be reading a selection of works specially written for the Festival by local people. Send Poetika Salisbury poems (max 5 mins) to be read at the event. Poetika is also creating a pamphlet of chosen poetry which will be on sale at the event and at other venues in town (all sale proceeds going to Poetika’s adopted charity, Childrens Chance).

You have until midnight on Saturday 30th September to email your pieces (5 mins max) to city@poetika.org.uk.

More about the Salisbury Literary Festival here: http://salisburyliteraryfestival.co.uk/

 

New venue for Salisbury’s poetry, prose open mic Poetika

Due to closure of the Cloisters Poetika has returned to the Pheasent Inn 19 Salt Lane, Salisbury SP1 1DT

The event will be found in the shoemaker’s hall-function room at the Pheasent Inn. Poetika starts its new season, in a new venue. The evening will premiere David King reading from his new collection ‘Strange Stranger’ Books will be on sale and donations from the book sale will go to the charity Children’s Chance.

The theme for the evening is Strangers and John Bruce and David Kind said

“We welcome all to come and present poetry or short pose, or perform acoustic songs, comedy or other performance – either their own or work they admire.”

Sign up is from 7.30pm on the night, performances begin at 7.45 – a small donation of £2.00 is invited towards room hire.

Poetick 47

Andover Story telling club starts this Thursday at Lunar Hare 7.45pm

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 Hare Today Story club, Thursday, 13th October,7.45-10 pm in The Snug,The Lunar Hare, Weyhill Road,AndoverAdmission Free

Come and listen, come and tell
Run by Mike Rogers 

Story, story! Who wants to hear a story? Everyone, of course.

“Once upon a time…”

“Come on! That’s just for kids!”

“All right – last Tuesday – ”

“That’s better!”

“… in a galaxy far, far away…”

“What?”

Stories are stories, they pick us up and they take us away, sometimes into other worlds, sometimes inside ourselves, to places we’ve never been or didn’t know were there. They bring us face to face with new things and with old things, and often the old things turn out to be new things, because we’re looking at them from another side.

Reading is good. You can do it anywhere, anytime, if there’s enough light to see. It disturbs no one. But it is a solitary vice.

Listening to a story, on the other hand, is something social. There is an interaction with the teller – they notice the reaction of you, the listener, and they can adjust their story to it. Actors on a stage, in a normal play, would find that much harder. They usually have a text to stick to. A storyteller only has a story – and they can tell it in the way they feel like at that very moment. What occurs to them – what occurs to you – it can all find a place in that story.

I have been telling stories for fourteen years. I have been writing stories since I was eight, and when I first came to Southampton Story Club I used to read aloud the stories I had written. I had written them to sound as though they were being told, so they had digressions and interruptions and spaces for audience reaction. Sometimes I still like to perform my stories that way, because a written story can be a lot more precise and complicated and detailed than a told one – it’s the relationship between lace and knitting. But mostly I tell.

What do I tell? Stories I like. Stories that go into me easily, because they fit my nature. I tell Greek myths. I tell Norse myths. I tell wonder-tales from Russia, with the Firebird in them. I tell stories from Japan, sad ones and happy ones. I tell classic folktales from Europe, as written by Perrault or collected by the Brothers Grimm. [I can tell stories in French and German as well.] I tell Jewish stories. I tell stories from Afghanistan and stories from the Arabian Nights.

I also tell stories that are true, if they have the right shape and feel. I have told the story of the first maypole in New England, at Merrymount, and the trouble it caused among the devout New Englanders. I have told the story of George Vancouver and his conflict with Mike Rogers Thomas Pitt, second Baron Camelford, and compared it with the behaviour of Maquinna, the chief of one of the tribes on Nootka Sound, which Vancouver explored and mapped. I have told the story of ‘Don Patricio’, the Irish international footballer and football manager, who saved Barcelona FC in the Spanish Civil War. I have told the story of Grayson Perry’s tapestry sequence, The Vanity of Small Differences.

There are stories everywhere. We make them up all the time. We change them and they change us. They are one of the ways in which we try to come to terms with the world.

I am always telling the same stories, and I am always hunting for new ones, and I am always thinking about how I can tell the old ones differently. I can also help people to tell stories – stories about themselves, about their lives up to now, about the way they would like their lives to be in the future. Imagination is the key to freedom – in the inner world and in the outer one.

 

 

WONDER OF WORDS is republished from https://suewrinch.wordpress.com with her permission

The first ‘Wonder Of Words’ was held at Winchester Discovery Centre on Thursday 28th July and fully lived up to its name.  It was an evening filled with a rich variety of inspiring words.

SteveScholeyIMG_1022

Steve Scholey

My inaugural ‘guest poet’, Steve Scholey entertained us with a  mix of both old and brand new poems.  So new in fact that he told me he was just putting the final touches to some minutes before going on!  I enjoyed these new poems in particular.  They were clever, concise and original, often having a wry twist or a word summing up the poem at the end. He also read poems reflecting his interest in geology and travels to Iceland.  A very enjoyable set.

 

There was plenty of time for Open Mic during the evening and we heard a wonderful variety of voices.  Poems, whether poignant, political or humorous were all interesting and affecting, showcasing a great wealth of local talent.  We were swept away by a tide of amazing words which is why I love setting up these evenings. ‘Wonder of Words’ will be held regularly on the last Thursday of the month and its main aim is to highlight and encourage local talent.  I may occasionally book an established poet – we shall see, but I’m really looking forward to hearing many more of your original and enthusiastic  voices over the coming months.