200 supporters qive away as Damon L Wakes reaches 50% of his croud funding

Ten Little Astronauts, the Christie-inspired sci-fi murder mystery by Damon L. Wakes, is approaching 200 supporters on Unbound. To celebrate, he’ll be sending a signed paperback copy of Unearthly Sleuths to one of those first 200 at random

Unearthly Sleuths is an anthology of speculative detective fiction by JayHenge Publishing. It includes two stories by Damon himself—lighthearted steampunk “The Card” and the significantly more sinister “Noise on The Wire”—as well as many more by a wide variety of other authors.

Unearthly sleuths an out of this world anthology

Unearthly sleuths an out of this world anthology

You’ll have to be quick if you want to be in with a chance of winning this book, though: 196 of those 200 places are already taken, meaning that there are just four still up for grabs! To put in a pledge for yourself, simply follow this link. As well as a chance of winning Unearthly Sleuths, you’ll get your very own copy of Ten Little Astronauts, have your name recorded in the back of every edition of the book. If the book reaches its funding target by Christmas, it’ll be distributed into bookshops through Penguin Random House, and you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing that you were one of the people who helped make it all happen.

Poetika are calling for poetry submissions for 2 different poetry festivals.

Salisbury Fringe Festival and Salisbury Literary Festival are both calling for poetry submissions.

 Poetika at the Salisbury Fringe: Call for Dramatic Poetry (closing date 30/9/2017)

Salisbury Fringe – the established festival of cutting-edge drama by local writers performed in a variety of informal venues during the first weekend in October. Poetika’s mission at the Fringe is to bring poetry to the drama. Poetika are seeking works of ‘dramatic poetry’ for the event, where they will be performed by professional actors.

Submissions close on  Saturday 30th September. E to email your pieces (5 mins max) to drama@poetika.org.uk .

To find out more about the Salisbury Fringe follow this link http://salisburyfringe.co.uk/

City of Poems’ (Salisbury Literary Festival ): Call for Poems about Salisbury (closing date 30/9/2017)

New this year- The Salisbury Literary Festival is  taking place over the last weekend of October it will be a feast of readings, talks and workshops, celebrating the best in literature by writers with a local connection and some from further afield.

Poetika has an event – City of Poems – as part of the festival, where in addition to presenting some of the best known poems written about the city, Poetika will be reading a selection of works specially written for the Festival by local people. Send Poetika Salisbury poems (max 5 mins) to be read at the event. Poetika is also creating a pamphlet of chosen poetry which will be on sale at the event and at other venues in town (all sale proceeds going to Poetika’s adopted charity, Childrens Chance).

You have until midnight on Saturday 30th September to email your pieces (5 mins max) to city@poetika.org.uk.

More about the Salisbury Literary Festival here: http://salisburyliteraryfestival.co.uk/

 

New venue for Salisbury’s poetry, prose open mic Poetika

Due to closure of the Cloisters Poetika has returned to the Pheasent Inn 19 Salt Lane, Salisbury SP1 1DT

The event will be found in the shoemaker’s hall-function room at the Pheasent Inn. Poetika starts its new season, in a new venue. The evening will premiere David King reading from his new collection ‘Strange Stranger’ Books will be on sale and donations from the book sale will go to the charity Children’s Chance.

The theme for the evening is Strangers and John Bruce and David Kind said

“We welcome all to come and present poetry or short pose, or perform acoustic songs, comedy or other performance – either their own or work they admire.”

Sign up is from 7.30pm on the night, performances begin at 7.45 – a small donation of £2.00 is invited towards room hire.

Poetick 47

Teapoets are returning on September 10th!

We here at Big Up Words are excited because The Teapoets Cafe is returning September 10th.

Co founder Cat Randle gets very excited. “I look forward to meeting up with all the poet’s and finding out what they’ve done on their summer break.”

Here they are in their own words

Spetember 10th

 

 

 

 

 

To kick off our new season, we look forward to welcoming guest poet Peter Roe, and singer-songwriter Lisa Thorne.

We welcome one and all who enjoy poetry (either as audience or readers). Come along and have some listening fun, and maybe introduce a friend to the joys of the spoken word too. A warm welcome awaits.

Rum’s Eg gallery and cafe are open throughout.

Spoken word open spots may be booked in advance by sending an email to signup1709@teapoet.org.uk and we will keep some in reserve on the door.

About the guest-Peter Roe guest poet

Peter RoePeter Roe was born and raised a ‘Northern Lad’ in Buxton in the Peak District. He has served in the RAF and has worked with computers and emerging technologies in education.
Peter is a poet, writer, film-maker and self confessed Nerd who likes to shatter people’s pre and misconceptions about “Computer Geeks and Anoraks!”
Peter’s poems and stories come out of that bit of the world where technology meets people and have been well received at public readings both in the South West of England and The Netherlands where he was dubbed ‘The Techno-Poet’. As the Millennium ticked over he became embroiled in a Poetry War with his Father and his Siblings… as the words flew it created a schism within the family. ‘The War of The Words’ that followed was a breeding ground for many of his performance pieces.
Forced into early retirement with only a dictionary and a smartphone for company… He remains an eternal optimist and describes himself as “Disabled by Bread… Soft int’ head… Dad of Three… Addicted to Eye Tee… Poet and Writer… App Game Fighter…”
He is constantly rhyming and punning and is currently working on ‘Reunification’ a poetry event with his Brother to be premiered at The Buxton Fringe in 2018.

Musical guest-Lisa Thorne

Lisa Thorne has never looked back since her uncle introduced her to the music of Steeleye Span when she was a child. Working with an intuitive style, she refines songs until they ‘fit’ the images in her mind.
She is particularly interested in the narrative of the voice, using words to pin down a point of that narrative, rather then to express or describe.
“Folk is certainly an influence,” explains Lisa, “as I adore the melody lines, harmonies, and rhythms.” We are delighted to introduce Lisa to the TeaPoet Collective as we feel her songs deserve wider exposure, and we’re sure you will agree.

And finally news about becoming a member of Teapoets 

Teapoet membership card 2017-2018 (4)

 

 

 

 

 

Our membership cards for the next season will be available when we return to Rum’s Eg on Sunday 10th September. For £30 you will get:

  • Admission to 8 TeaPoet Cafes (September to April) for the price of 6
  • Admission for a guest to the above events for half price
  • The opportunity to sell your books etc. on our merchandise table

 

 

 

 

BUW founder member Roy Chatfield finalist in inaugural Terrence Rattigan Society award.

Roy Chatfield

Roy Chatfield

Andover Playwright Roy Chatfield is one of the seventeen writers shortlisted for the inaugural Terrence Rattigan Society award. His play Going Back is an updating of Ulysses return to modern-day Central Africa.
The judges – writer Julian Fellowes, actor David Suchet, director Thea Sharrock and academic Dan Rebellato – are now reading the shortlisted entries and will announce their decision at an awards ceremony at Harrow School on 26 September 2017.
The winner receives a cash prize and a guaranteed production of at least six nights at the Sara Thorne Theatre, Broadstairs, with a rehearsed reading on offer to the runner-up.
Roy said ‘I’m delighted to be shortlisted. As the closing date for entries was last August, I’d assumed I hadn’t made it. They obviously read all the scripts thoroughly.’
The competition received 197 entries, of which seven were ineligible – always read the rules! Competitions such as this are a good way of promoting your work as they aim to discover unknown writers.

The Poetika Echo 46 – The Worst One Yet!!

he Poetika Echo 46: The Worst One Yet!!
(hosted by John Bruce, Echo brought to you this month by Ian Chorlton)

Wow, so many people, our biggest crowd since records began (ed: not quite), 32 listeners, writers, poets, musicians, presenters and drinkers, all climbed the wrought iron steps of the Cloisters pub to attend this month’s Poetika.

John was tonight’s host, fresh from seeing Mr Corbyn at Tolpuddle Martyrs Festival. He introduced Edwin with his self-suggested controversial Corbyn Brexit poem. Good to start with a bit of politics. Before he began he made sure all the exits were clear and reminded everyone that he was a pensioner wearing glasses. He need not have worried, Poetika is all about diversity and tolerance unless you’re praising Theresa May!

Mike informed us that the British poet Edward Thomas died 100 years ago and he is dedicating tonight’s trio of sonnets to him. (There are six in total which can all be found on his blog). Edward wrote a poem about Adlestrop, a now defunct station in a tiny Gloucestershire village where he once stopped and wrote a poem about peacefulness just before war broke it. The same Great War which took his life in 1917. Mike’s first sonnet was a response to this poem. our fears do not create chance beauty but destroy. That halt was scheduled – if you like, intended – But not, let’s hope, the way his journey ended.

Battlefields explores why wars occur and the futility of it, War came, and was not brought, by what men did or thought,

Sarah’s debut performance at Poetika began with two poems about an ex. Before they split, then after. Before; Past mask of disguise, heart beats faster at every breath, I fell like a comet, high and happy. After; saint and sinner, must keep going, who knew the ending? Life is a gift we must cherish.

Vic with his guitar played a sing-along ditty entitled ‘I don’t care about Doctor Who.’ There is nothing you can’t be, but I doubt the eldest will teach PE.’ Then we all joined in with every chorus.

Syd hit us with an amusing rap born on the mean streets of Romsey, about his greatest failing, self-promotion. So continuing with the crowd participation half the room chanted self, self, self, and the other half, promotion! Hotter than a sheep, cooler than a goat. Bestselling author, isn’t no lie, been nominated for noble prize, I’m the hardest rapper since 50 cent.

Ian added shade to light with a multi-layered story about the murky world of selling of arms in Yemen during war and famine. but life in London is ignoring the activities in the dessert, and the search for a criminal.

David, a free-range farm kid (from Friday Street near Eastbourne) turned poet and artist told us about coincidences. His poem was about how he went back to find the farm. Perhaps you should never go back. Hedgerows where rabbits lived, landmarks, the borders of my world. Stamping bull, sweaty men in shorts sleeves, all gone.

Now for our special guest this evening, winner of a string of slams, it’s Stewart Taylor, the world’s worst poet. He began with a poem loosely about Isadora Duncan the mother of contemporary dance. This lead into an ode to the working classes. How wonderful they are, salt of the earth, until the end of the poem, not so fond of the dirt, I despise the working classes, cheap lager from plastic glasses, I think I might be one of them as well!!

Southampton is famous for Ikea, Salisbury has a Cathedral with the Magna Carta (Big Chart). The first pops stars, King John and the Barons, beat Cliff Richard to the top, as he was on a religious tour! So we journeyed down and got our kicks from the not so famous A36.

A more sombre poem followed about WWI, daddy what did you do in the war, she watches as he turns away, some things you cannot say to a child. Then no to plastic bags just because they are wrong. The last poem was all about the out doing of the doer. No matter what you do or say, always remember someone did it before you; quicker, slicker, sweeter and cheaper, but don’t let that put you off.

THE INTERVAL.

Randomly throughout the first half, John came up with this great idea based on the theme of ‘worst’ that every act could state what they were worst at. However, it was so random I did not write everyone’s down. So to ensure no one is left out, here is a worst of everyone montage. I am worst at; sticking to principles, keeping my opinions to myself, self-promotion, writing short poems, cooking, running, naming German sausages and arriving on time (that was Derek’s).

How did we pack so much into the first half? I fear Poetika 46 is bursting at the seams and will surly overrun, and all the better for it, so off we go again, more music, more thoughtfulness, more laughter and of course more poetry?

Adam opens Act 2 with a song about the underbelly of Southampton. Many divides in the town, everyone wears their crown. Stranded on the borderline. Little shits outside smashing up my garden fence, do they think I stay inside and not take offence, baseball bat by the door….in the city.

And now James and Alfredo the Wonder DogBusy with my business, no time to write a song, two cups of coffee, straight back to bed, blurry day, not much sleep last night, busy writing lyrics to the sound track of my life. Perhaps a message about procrastination, the muse may never come, we must grab it and make things happen!!

Then a poem of love, mellow like Green sleeves and Scarborough fair, a four-leaf clover will bring you luck and a song of love.

Cat, with a cheeky poem about Stewart Taylor, the best part about Stewart Taylor is Stewart Taylor’s wife.

Peter’s debut, 3 poems written in 38 degrees’ heat on a train. Sea 1 and Sea 2 for his 5-year-old son. I stood with you 100 years ago, blue month of August. Then the third ‘when it came.’ A ghost by the river, it came just before dawn when the wind picked up, crept in, climbed up into my bed.

Another debutante, Ria, two poems about Wiltshire and India. Butterflies fallen to golden feathered wheat, still in this moment dedicated to me. Colours. India full of diversity but still troubled by the stark realities of a divisive caste system. Day for perfection, Disney princess bride, we are the decorated women, the ways of colour clash, then part. 

Papa Webb returns for more cheeky ditties. On a dark and stormy night, a wizard met a witch. If God was a man and created man in his own image, he must have has some self-awareness issues.
Then a limerick about Fairy tale balls, choppers and whoppers and tears.

Junior Papa Webb, Nick took to the stage. Normally a song writer but happy to try his hand at poetry in a song lyric style. Right where I don’t Belong. I tie myself to a firework, space here I come, I stare t my phone and wonder why no one calls.

Oh well, last day on earth, what can I say, rob this town, pull its pants down, arrest me, take me, I don’t agree, and shoot them down, oh well, oh well, oh well.

Anna, another Poetika first, her poem is a tribute to her tutor Lynn who helped her with her dyslexia. Hated Oreo’s as a child, just too wild, hated all things English until I met you.

Derek returned, self-confessed, late again, but always worth the wait. Derek, good at telling bad jokes. Especially if the stakes are high! (or should that be steaks?). His poem was about an art installation with the words ‘I love you’ in 311 languages. Wall of Love (Mr soppy or ode to his girlfriend). 311 words to say I love you, 311 ways to mislead, misinform, misdirect. A little cynicism slipping into this love poem. Another about a trip to Disney Land Paris, from steamboat Willie to photo opportunity, a shop, all the punters taken for another ride. A second helping of possible cynicism creeping in.

Roya made her first appearance and read a fascinating piece of flash fiction. Marie Antoinette is helping her flat mates move. But keeps producing pillows but achieves little else much to the frustration of the others. Then Mark appears with two full sized antlers. Marie Antoinette doesn’t understand.

POWER CUT, the lights go out…..no wait, it’s all part of the finale drama, welcome to the stage our even more special guest, J Arthur Prufrock.

He complains that he has been misnamed in the local press. But, ‘before I read this poem’ we, the audience get instructions on the form of the poem, the history, how to react to certain parts, especially stanza 71, 74, 75 and 129. So, as he is about to treat us to sixty minutes of artistic and poetic genius he is rudely interrupted by John. Time check, Poetika has burst at the seams, we are running wild crazily beyond 9.30, even more outrageously heading to 10 and beyond, unknown territory. ‘I can’t do anything shorter, but I can do something concise.’ With that, he launches into the final delight poem of the evening.

So as the evening ends and our extra-large audience queue to exit the building there is still time for some final announcement.

No Poetika next month, the gasps of shock reverberate around the Cloisters. Summer break. But wait, it’s not all bad news, Poetika will return on Wednesday 20th September, everyone has two whole months to write new material or rehash old ones. Then October will be a special month, an early Sunday Poetika for the Salisbury Fringe, usual fare on Wed 19th then again at the end of the month for the inaugural Salisbury Literary Festival.

And finally, Deborah and David Robinson have their latest art on display from July 21st until August the 3rd. Well worth a visit, I was there on Friday night enjoying nibbles and wine watch the apocalyptic rain in the safe surroundings of the Hayloft, Wick Lane, Christchurch.

Ian

And finally finally – have a great summer break from all at Poetika.Poeticka on holiday 2017

Open Word starts this weekend at Arundels

Open Words Arnudels (Ted Health’s house) SP1 2EN Cathedral Close Salisbury June 11th starting at 1.30-4.30 

Yes Open Word is back with 2 dates and loads of fun. We start this weekend at Arundels. This is our first event in a garden. Bring picnic blankets, chairs and lots of poetry. We will be having an open Mic so looking forward to your poems.

Poetry guest Paul Canon Harris 

Paul_Cannon_Harris

Paul is a poet and versatile writer based in Bournemouth. Published work includes two poetry collections, and non-fiction works on spirituality, leadership and communication. Recent poems have featured on Yellow Buses and in the PR for an aid convoy to Aleppo. He broadcasts regularly on BBC Radio 2 and other stations and performs poetry at festivals and venues in the UK and abroad.
Guest Musician Steve Faulkner 
Steve is unique amongst performers in the Folk genre in that he has never, ever been even nominated for any award of any kind. He remains unconcerned by this, as awards for performing arts seem to him to be, “Comparing Chalk and Cheese and then giving the prize to an Avocado.” Hailing from Poole in Dorset, Steve is a multi-instrumentalist and vocalist with his own take on Traditional, Folk and Acoustic music. Playing Fiddle, Bouzouki, Low Whistles, Bodhrán and to everyone’s surprise (including his) Double Bass and Bass Guitar, he has worked over the past 20 or so years in a number of groups across the UK and Europe with wide ranging musical appeal as well as giving solo performances. Appearing on a discography of five album and one EP release, Steve can go from lively in-yer-face frontman to sensitive accompanist at will and anything in between.

With special guest MC

Dave reading from one of his books.

Dave reading from one of his books.

David is a regular at Teapoets and other open Mic around the South East. He has been guest at many open mic’s around the South East England David’s poetry has a strong connection to our world and his poetry helps us relate to our earth and ourselves in new ways.
The Travelling Bookstall will be available along with books by the performers and MC.

 

Pop up play writing courses in your own home, village hall or care home

POP UP PLAYWRITING with Angela Street

Angela Street contacted Big Up Words with an idea to help writers in rural areas. This is a pilot scheme and could be a feature if there is enough uptake. Anglea runs many successful playwriting groups in Salisbury and her pupils are having plays produced in London and closer to home. Her new venture brings the writing closer to your home.

Angela Street

Angela Street

POP UP PLAYWRITING

Popping up anywhere in the South West. Providing affordable writing workshops. The workshop comes to you, saving you travel costs and time.

Days available from 5 May: Mondays, Tuesdays, some Saturdays, Sundays

Half days:  10:00 – 1:00   Whole days:  10:00 – 4:00    Evenings:  any 3 hours.

If you’d like to host a workshop in your house or on your premises, and you have space suitable for at least 7 writers, maximum 15 writers, please contact me to arrange a time and date.

As the host, you will get the workshop free and can choose the topic or general theme most suitable for your group if you wish. You must agree on this with the tutor 6 weeks before the date of the workshop so that the tutor can prepare relevant material and advertising copy.

Topics may include: creating characters, dialogue, structure, conflict, stage directions, subtext, unblocking, comedy, voice, the absurd. Writing monologues, writing for radio, writing comedy sketches, generating new ideas

Workshops can cover basic techniques for writers new to playwriting through to advanced editing skills, or take the form of a tutored writing retreat.

The tutor will advertise the workshop locally in consultation with the host and will provide flyers for the host to hand out or distribute locally.

The host is asked to provide teas/coffees and in the case of full days either an undramatic lunch or advise participants to bring their own packed lunch.

The host must inform the tutor if they have dogs, cats or other livestock on the premises and agree with appropriate health and safety measures with the tutor.

All workshops are smoke-free, including vapes, and mobile free zones. There will be scheduled breaks.

Access and Parking: the host will be asked to provide information, for example, whether there is wheelchair access or steps into the premises.

Workshops require a minimum of 7 writers to run.  If fewer than 7 people have signed up and paid, the workshop will be cancelled.

Costs: Half day/Evening £25 (15 concs)    Full day £40 (£25 concs)

Please let me know any reasons people have for not attending, such as cost, travel, childcare, access, time, topics covered.

This is a pilot scheme to find out if there is an appetite for affordable writing workshops in rural areas.  If successful, I will apply to the Arts Council for funding to assist writers needing financial help with fees or childcare, to provide rural workshops in wheelchair accessible venues, such as village halls, and also for smaller group sizes, with only 4 or 5 writers.  

 Contact: angelastreet@tiscali.co.uk  01722 322143

If you’d like to know more go over to her website https://angelastreetwriter.wordpress.com/

Andover 1st Rock music festival

Andover Rocks is an innovative music event which is being held on April 1st 2017 to raise much-needed funds for The Junction and music intervention in Adult mental health. The event consists of a whole day and evening of music and music related workshops being held across 5 venues around the town. The aim is to provide something musical for everyone from well-known acts such as The Torn off Strips and Jon Walsh through to more alternative events like the Gong Bath, Drum Running, Gospel Choir and Poetry. In addition String brokers are providing free 20-minute guitar lessons

Not only are you going to get brilliant music all day, you will get to see poetry from Dan Hooks, Syd Meats, Damian O’Vitch, Cat Randle and Just Us!

The Venues are:

  • The Methodist church
  • The Rock House
  • The White Hart
  • The Time Ring
  • The Hayward Suite (Wolversdene Club)Poetry from 5.30-7.30

Tickets – Tickets are £10 per adult, £2.50 a child, 5 and under’s are free, please note this is a roaming ticket and will get you access to all venues. Tickets are available from Stringbrokers, The White Hart, The Rock House, The Wolversdene Club, The Methodist Church, The Junction and MBE.

April 1st Andover Rocks

 

 

How 10 Little Astronauts went from a MA with distinction to a book

Big Up Words are going to publish a series of blogs where writers talk about their publishing journeys. Damon L. Wake’s book 10 Little Astronauts is going to be published by Unbound.

I think there’s a moment in any academic project when you question everything you’ve done so far. For me, that moment came when I was sitting in a café with someone on the same Creative Writing MA as me at the University of Winchester. She picked up my work, read a bit, and said “Huh. So you’re handing in Agatha Christie fanfiction in space?” That was the moment I realised that I was taking a massive, massive gamble with my entire course. It was the moment I considered binning the whole thing and starting again, and it was the moment I decided to press on regardless. Partly that was because I was confident that the setting did work with the story, partly because I didn’t have time to come up with anything else.

 

Fortunately, in the end, it all went pretty well. As strange as it felt to submit a mash-up between And Then There Were None and Alien as a serious academic project, the novella was awarded a Distinction and, shortly afterwards, accepted for publication. But more on that later.

The thing about space is that it works extraordinarily well as a setting for a mystery thriller. In space, no one can hear you scream. In zero gravity, no one can hear your footsteps either. The truly colossal distances involved in travelling between stars—far enough that an S.O.S sent at the speed of light will still take years to be heard—guarantee that nobody is coming to help. The hostility of the environment itself means that the characters must work together to survive, even as paranoia threatens to drive them apart and a large part of the inspiration behind Ten Little Astronauts.

 

I’d thoroughly enjoyed ‘And Then There Were None’ but found it took a long time to get started. There’s a lot of scene-setting—several whole chapters—dedicated to explaining how the various characters came together and why they can’t escape after it becomes apparent that one of them is a serial killer. The tension only reaches its peak after a whole series of murders has whittled the cast down to just three or four.

By shifting the setting of my novella to interstellar space, I managed to move the discovery of the first murder to the very first page. Having been woken from suspended animation, chosen from a crew of thousands to respond to, a fire on board the ship, none of the ten astronauts knows any of the others. However, having discovered the body of an eleventh person at the scene of the incident—an incident that has also disabled the ship’s computer—they know that one of their numbers is an imposter who intends to kill them all. With no life support, and the masses of frozen crewmembers causing the air temperature to plummet, the ten astronauts have to split up to repair the damage despite knowing that anyone, in any group, could be the murderer.

 

Having sunk an enormous amount of time and effort into Ten Little Astronauts for my course, and since it had been well-received academically, I decided to submit it to Scott Pack—an editor at Unbound—as part of a one-to-one meeting at the Winchester Writers’ Festival this summer. He passed on my manuscript, and within a couple of weeks, I got an email back saying that they had decided to launch the book!

Unbound are a crowdfunding publisher—pre-orders from readers are what fund the initial run of first editions, with trade paperbacks distributed to bookshops by Penguin Random House after that—and they set me up with a video for the book. They let me pick the location, and since I’d done a good chunk of my research for it on board HMS Alliance at the Royal Navy Submarine Museum, I got in touch with the museum staff to see if they’d be happy for us to film on board. Visiting the submarine while writing had helped me pin down the atmosphere of the spacecraft in the book, so I was thrilled when they agreed to let us shoot the video itself inside.

Damon L Wakes

HMS Alliance background to Damon’s Unbound video.

 

Since the crowdfunding campaign started, I’ve been doing everything I can to get the word out about the book. I’m hardly a big-name author, so the biggest challenge by far is letting people know it exists. Unbound recommended offering attractive rewards for supporters of the book, and because I’ve been making and selling chainmail jewellery for a few years now, I’ve been offering one reward option that includes a necklace. The necklace is made of anodised aluminium—the same material as the International Space Station—which I think helps keep it relevant to the sci-fi story even though the technique is a thousand years old! I take the necklaces themselves to craft fairs, which makes for a natural conversation-starter when it comes to the book.

Damon's speci

 

If you’d like to read some of Ten Little Astronauts now, you can find a sample over on Unbound’s website. And if it sounds like a book you’d enjoy, please consider putting in a pledge: as well as getting a copy for yourself, your name will appear in the back of every edition to show that you were one of the great people who helped make it happen.

1 killer
10 suspects,
10,000,000,000,000 miles from help
Support Ten Little Astronauts on Unbound today!